Accordion History in India, Thailand and Veitnam
Accordion History

HISTORY OF THE ACCORDION IN INDIA

India conjures up images of sitars, tablas and tambourines, and traditional music has not integrated the accordion. Religious music, which does not use the accordion, uses an instrument with free reeds with bellows worked with the left hand, somewhat like a harmonium. The accordion is played in films, as the accompaniment in many songs. It is also often present in stage shows and pop music. The piano accordion is the most popular type of accordion in India.

HISTORY OF THE ACCORDION IN THAILAND

The Cheng is very popular in Thailand, where it is called the kaen. The instruments sound (somewhere between that of an organ and an accordion) is popular today for playing a universal style of music similar to their blues. There are some accordionists, such as Saman Karnchanoplin, who is a composer of popular Thai music. He also plays international variety and traditional music, accompanied by the piano.

Damrong Chatalada, known as an accordion review writer all over the world, is also a very good classical accordionist who began teaching himself in 1954. He has performed numerous concerts in countries such as Austria, Switzerland and Singapore.

HISTORY OF THE ACCORDION IN VIETNAM

At the beginning of the 1930s, the chromatic accordion was very popular. It was brought to Vietnam by the French colonists (who came from Japan). Bach-Sac was born in 1910 and was the first known Vietnamese to play the piano accordion in 1933. By 1949 he was skilled on both this and the chromatic accordion. He was drawn towards the musette accordion, and brought it back to Vietnam from where he studied in France. During his military service, he played for many army festivities. He temporarily gave up the accordion in 1941, but began playing again in 1946 when he began playing at dances.
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